Getting Back Baby Jack – Putative Father Registration and Consent to Adoption in Arizona

A nightmare scenario for one Utah father has made national news.  The most disconcerting part of his story is that it could happen again right here in Arizona.

In 2010, Jake Strickland learned that he was to become a father.  Strickland and the baby’s mother, Whitney Pettersson Rathjen, mutually agreed to share joint responsibility for the care of their son despite their inability to maintain their intimate relationship together.  As the pregnancy progressed, Strickland became more and more involved.  He invited Rathjen to numerous family gatherings, paid for medical expenses and groceries, attended doctor appointments, and even converted a room in his home into a nursery to prepare for the arrival and care of his child.

During this time, Strickland and Rathjen briefly discussed the issue of whether Strickland should register as the baby’s putative father.  A putative father registry reserves potential paternity rights (including consent to adoption) for the unwed biological father of a child in the event that parentage is disputed after the baby is born.  The legal presumption is that the husband of a married woman is the biological father of her child unless the unwed biological father overcomes legal barriers to establishing paternity, one of which is putative father registration.

Sledding

Rathjen insisted that Strickland not register and take the mother at her word that she would not attempt to terminate his parental rights.  She even went so far as to threaten Strickland, saying that she would never allow him to see the baby if he submitted his name to the putative father registry.  Strickland, although leery of Rathjen’s odd response, felt he had no choice and never registered.

The day before the baby was born, Strickland and Rathjen spent the evening hours together walking through downtown Salt Lake City and enjoying the Christmas lights on display.  On December 29, 2010, Rathjen gave birth and, unbeknownst to Strickland, declared that she did not know the identity of the father and immediately consented to an adoption.

For eight days, Rathjen ignored or curtly responded to Strickland’s attempts to communicate with her.  At one point, Rathjen affirmed that she was still scheduled to have the baby by Caesarean section on January 12 before finally divulging the truth on January 5.  Since then, Strickland has been embroiled in an extensive and complex legal dispute with Rathjen, her attorneys, the adoptive parents, LDS Family Services, and the State of Utah over his wrongfully terminated parental rights.

Strickland alleges that Rathjen worked together with social workers and the adoptive family to streamline the adoption process and guarantee that he could not assert his paternal right to consent to the adoption until it was too late.  Strickland has been battling for the restoration of his parental rights for three years and filed a civil suit for fraud, racketeering, and other claims on January 2, 2014.  Essentially, Strickland believes that Utah law creates an adoption system that a birth mother can use to defraud an unwed father out of his parental rights with little to no recourse.

It is not yet clear whether the courts will vindicate Strickland’s claims, and the story is certain to continue to evolve as the civil case progresses (the adoption challenge, however, has reached the appellate stage and has established a clear record of factual wrongdoing even if the law does not create an eventual remedy).  That said, the case of “Baby Jack” in Utah could have happened much the same way in Arizona or one of numerous other states with similar unwed paternity law.

Arizona’s putative father registry statute allows an unwed father to register his claim of paternity and to receive notice of adoption proceedings.  The unwed father must affirm that he is willing and able to support the child and actively seeking paternity in a separate action.  The unwed father must register within thirty days of the child’s birth unless he proves by clear and convincing evidence that it was impossible at the time, but the father’s lack of knowledge of the pregnancy is specifically excluded as a reason for failure to file within the thirty-day period.  The statute, codified at A.R.S. § 8-106.01, declares that “the fact that the putative father had sexual intercourse with the mother is deemed to be notice to the putative father of the pregnancy.”  Furthermore, the adoption consent statute (A.R.S. § 8-106) requires the putative father to object to a proposed adoption by filing a paternity petition and serving it to the mother.

19th Century Family

This means that a father’s right to consent to, or reject, a potential adoption of his child can be defeated if the mother simply refuses to tell him about the pregnancy or the date of the child’s birth.  The Baby Jack scenario could easily be repeated in Arizona – and may already have occurred – because the statute does not waive its strict requirements in the event of fraud.  In fact, in 1971, then-Attorney General Gary K. Nelson issued an opinion recommending that the putative father registry statute be amended to require notice to all fathers whose identity is known when an adoption proceeding is initiated.  Op.Atty.Gen. No. 73-5-L.  Unfortunately, it appears that the Legislature ignored Mr. Nelson’s advice and still requires strict compliance with the onerous requirements of § 8-106.01.

As a result, one need not be a legal mystery writer to imagine the potential for a pregnant woman to accept the help of the baby’s father until shortly before childbirth and then dodge service of the paternity petition (assuming the putative father even receives notice of the adoption or manages to register in time).  The mere possibility of this result, let alone its apparent likelihood, is preposterous in today’s sophisticated world of family law.  Unfortunately, as long as states rely on antiquated notions of legitimacy and parental rights initially formulated almost a century or more in the past, the ability of well-meaning fathers to protect themselves will be handicapped.

Accordingly, the best way for an unwed father to protect his parental rights is to register before the baby is born notwithstanding his trust in the mother.  Admittedly, this advice is not helpful to an unwed father who does not learn of the pregnancy in time, either through mistake or misconduct by the mother, but early registration remains the best way to protect paternity rights.  That said, existing putative father law in Arizona and other states is not particularly effective at protecting the rights of fathers who want to be involved in their child’s upbringing.

 

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